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Rabbit’s Carrot Soup

Carrot Soup | Rabbit's Garden | Winnie the Pooh via BrytonTaylor.com

My most favourite book in the whole kitchen is surprisingly not a cookbook. It’s a ‘Flavor Bible‘ (note: Amazon Affiliate link), a book that gives you lists of ingredients that compliment or enhance a particular ingredient. With it, you realise all the possibilities. Of course you do need to know how to cook before you start fiddling, I’m sure plenty could go wrong if you chucked everything together, but for coming up with new recipe ideas, it’s wonderful.

Along with lists, you also get little snippets of dish names from chefs around the world, or little tips. Now, I’m not a huge fan of cooked carrot in general, and especially the everyday carrot soup I’ve tasted. But it was one of the tips in the book that made me realise that adding fresh carrot juice to soup helps bring that freshness and brightness back into the dish. With this tip in mind, I fiddled with a a basic carrot soup recipe and I bring you this. The peach juice was just on a whim that ended with excellent results- it gives it a bit of zip and ‘lightens’ the soup. To garnish, add a little sprig of carrot top.

Carrot Soup | Rabbit's Garden | Winnie the Pooh via BrytonTaylor.com

 

Rabbit's Carrot Soup
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 20 baby carrots, boiled and pureed
  • 1.5 tbsp butter
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1⅓ cup fresh carrot juice
  • 1 tbsp carrot tops, finely chopped
  • juice of 2 peaches
Instructions
  1. Start this recipe by getting together all your ingredients. Juice your peaches, juice your carrots (these can be big carrots, not baby carrots), and boil and puree your baby carrots.
  2. Then in a medium saucepan, stir together all the ingredients over medium heat, bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for about 15 minutes.
Notes
If you're wanting this to be more of a main meal rather than an entree, I'd suggest doubling the recipe.

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One Comment

  1. Just a note re your “Notes” – Americans reading your suggestion about doubling the recipe if the carrot soup is to serve as a main dish might be slightly confused. In America, “main dish” and “entree” are used interchangeably to mean the same thing. When a smaller amount of food is served before the main course, we call that an “appetizer.” (Yes, I know it makes more linguistic sense that an “entree” should mean something that comes as an “entry” to the meal. But then, the US is the country that brought the world Madonna, Microsoft, and the CIA – we don’t always make too much sense.)

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